1967–20171967–2017

Aspen was a multimedia magazine of the arts published by Phylis Johnson from 1965 to 1971. Each issue had a new designer and editor. “Aspen”, Johnson said, “should be a time capsule of a certain period, point of view or person”. New York-based Irish artist and critic Brian O'Doherty edited aspen 5+6, a double issue of the magazine, which was published in 1967.
     aspen 5+6 is currently being exhibited as part of the Coast-Lines exhibition at The Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA). The Collections Department at IMMA invited the Orthogonal Methods Group (OMG) to respond to Aspen 5+6. Our response, entitled 1967-2017, considers the legacies of Aspen 5+6 and Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.). E.A.T. was established in 1967 – the same year in which Aspen 5+6 was published – in response to the success of the previous year's 9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering, a series of events at New York City's 69th Regiment Armory.
     One facet of OMG's response is an object called Placement as Language. It has a physical manifestation at IMMA for the duration of the exhibition and an online manifestation below and on Twitter.

Click here to download the guide to OMG's response to the Aspen 5+6 exhibit at Coast-Lines.

Placement as Language

Aspen 5+6 contained three essays: Roland Barthes' Death of the Author; George Kubler's Style and the Historical Representation of Time; and Susan Sontag's The Aesthetics of Silence.
     Here the original communication platform — a magazine in a box —is replaced by a contemporary one — Twitter. Two feeds are produced, each of which is available to read here via Twitter and also in the gallery printed onto streams of paper.
     1 @aspen_ordered divides the three essays into Twitter-sized 140 character chunks, transmitting them one by one into the world.
     2 @aspen_reordered employs an algorithm to create new variations on the original texts. These variations are generated by a statistical algorithm called a Markov Chain that generates sentences based on the probability of one word following another in the original text.

1 Ordered
2 Reordered

@aspen_ordered

is perfectly read; this is because the true locus of writing is reading. (2/2)

Let us return to Balzac's sentence: no one (that is, no "person") utters it: its source, its voice is not to be located; and yet it (1/2)

to refuse to arrest meaning is finally to refuse God and his hypostases, reason, science, the law. (3/3)

"secret:' that is, an ultimate meaning, liberates an activity which we might call counter-theological, properly revolutionary, for (2/3)

Thus literature (it would be better, henceforth, to say writing), by refusing to assign to the text (and to the world as text) a (1/3)

writing is to be traversed, not penetrated: writing ceaselessly posits meaning but always in order to evaporate it: it proceeds to a (3/4)

(like a stocking that has run) in all its recurrences and all its stages, but there is no underlying ground; the space of the (2/4)

In a multiple writing, indeed, everything is to be distinguished, but nothing deciphered; structure can be followed, "threaded" (1/4)

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@aspen_reordered

One need not speak as categorically as Nietzsche, who thought the spread of irony can be only similar but not identical, being (1/3)

Sometimes the ground has greater visibility than the crippled one of its own, time divides only for organisms experiencing sequences (1/2)

For Rilke the overcoming of the work of art from the illusion that it might be possible to pass beyond it.

no neutral discourse, no neutral surface, no neutral form. (2/2)

There is no neutral discourse, no neutral surface, no neutral discourse, no neutral theme, no neutral theme, no neutral discourse, (1/2)

forward-looking, imposing the past of his available time and the statistician is very far from condemning this rhetoric as (2/3)

Every portrayal affects the identity of what is voiced by the same relation of antecedence a father maintains with his work is (1/3)

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